Guarantees Of Origin

The concept of the Guarantee Of Origin (GO, GoO) was initially introduced back in 2001 by the EU Directive 2001/77/EC and further developed via Article 15 of the European Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (the same DIrective is also known as the Renewables Directive or the RES Directive).
According to the RES Directive, the Guarantee of Origin is an electronic document which has the sole function to serve as a proof to a final customer that a given share or quantity of energy was produced from renewable sources. One Guarantee of Origin is equal to 1 MWh and should be issued on request of any renewable energy producer in Europe.
A guarantee of origin can be transferred, independently of the energy to which it relates, from one holder to another.
The European Guarantees Of Origin are tradable certificates and can be used in any EU Member State (plus Norway and Switzerland) that has implemented the above mentioned Directive. Currently, the EU Guarantees Of Origin are internationally tradable via a hub operated by the Association of Issuing Bodies (AIB).

  • Guarantee of origin: What is it?
    Legal background
    How it starts? The concept of the Guarantee of Origin (GO, GoO) was initially introduced back in 2001 by the...
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  • Guarantees of origin: How it works?
    How it works
    What can I do with a Guarantee of Origin? A guarantee of origin can be transferred, independently of the energy...
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  • Green markets
    Guarantees of Origin vs. Green Certificates
    Is there market for Guarantees of Origin? What is the price of one GO? There are voluntary markets (often referred...
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  • Green electricity labels
    Guarantees of origin vs. Green labels
    What is Green label? Green labels (short of green electricity quality labels, but also known as Eco labels, Eco standards,...
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  • Guarantees of origin: Electricity disclosure
    Electricity disclosure & double counting
    What is double counting? How can I avoid it? Double counting (sometimes used as double attributing, or double claiming) refers...
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Guarantees of origin: Electricity disclosure

What is double counting? How can I avoid it? Double counting (sometimes used as double attributing, or double claiming) refers the risk of electricity attributes being allocated intentionally, or unintentionally, to two separate end-users. In order the double counting to be avoided, all Member States shall ensure that the same unit of energy from renewable sources is taken into account only once. However, in Europe also exist the so called European Energy Certificate System (EECS), which is a standardization system for the European Guarantees of Origin (EU GOs) and which makes all forms of double counting, attributing or claiming impossible. What is electricity disclosure? How to avoid double disclosure? Electricity Disclosure is a requirement implemented in the revised Electricity Market Directive (2009/72/EC). All suppliers of electricity to final customers have to disclose to their customers proper information regarding their fuel-mix in the preceding year. In order to avoid the double disclosure, energy from renewable sources in relation to which the accompanying guarantee of origin has been sold separately by the producer should not be disclosed or sold to the final customer as energy from renewable sources. Some countries have more strict disclosure rules than others, however most countries agree the electricity tracking via the EECS-GO system is one of the best methods to ensure proper fuel-mix disclosure. Additionally, a project for Reliable Disclosure Systems for Europe (RE-DISS project) was launched in April 2010 in order to improve the reliability and accuracy of electricity disclosure. Furthermore a European Platform for Electricity Disclosure (EPED) was also put in place.
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